Alternativni pogoni, sistemi i komponente

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Geza
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Re: Alternativni pogoni, sistemi i komponente

Post od Geza » 23 Avg 2017, 22:11

Audi seeks to increase driving range of EVs with solar-embedded panoramic roofs
http://europe.autonews.com/article/2017 ... r-embedded

BEIJING -- Audi is working with China's Hanergy Thin Film Power Group to integrate solar cells into panoramic glass roofs for upcoming Audi electric vehicles.

Alta Devices, a unit of the Chinese solar cell firm Hanergy, will design the solar-embedded vehicle roof that will eventually help increase the range of EVs by feeding solar energy into internal electrical systems, such as air conditioning and other appliances, Audi said in a statement.

The prototype of the vehicle with a solar roof will be built by the end of this year, Audi said, without giving any details on investment and estimated time frame for mass-production.

Integrating Alta Devices’ thin-film solar cells into a panoramic glass roof would be a first step. In the future, almost the entire roof surface would be covered with solar cells. The electricity generated would flow into the car’s electrical system to supply devices such as the air-conditioning system or the seat heaters – a gain in efficiency that has a "direct positive impact on the range of an electric vehicle," Audi said.

"That would be a milestone along the way to achieving sustainable and emission-free mobility," said Bernd Martens, Audi's procurement chief, in the statement.

Audi, which has been grappling with car recalls, prosecutor investigations and persistent criticism from unions and managers over an emissions scandal, is currently looking to shift its focus to EVs. Last month, Audi said it aimed to cut costs by about $12 billion by 2022 to help fund the shift. It is also looking to free up funds for investments in zero-emission technology by developing a new production platform with Porsche, allowing both VW brands to save money by sharing components and modules.

Audi plans to launch three battery-electric models by 2020 and aims to cover one third of its vehicle sales with fully electric drivetrains by 2025. Audi's EV offensive will begin next year with the launch of an SUV based on the e-tron quattro concept

Hanergy presented four solar-powered EVs last year, and has been seeking to cooperate with car producers to mass produce its solar devices.

The partnership adds the two companies to a growing effort to use photovoltaics on more car roofs. Japan's Panasonic has started producing a 180-watt array of solar cells able to be fixed to the roof of an automobile. Meanwhile, Nissan offers an add-on solar panel option for its Leaf electric car.
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Laki021
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Re: Alternativni pogoni, sistemi i komponente

Post od Laki021 » 23 Avg 2017, 22:48

Ufff, to ce sigurno za bar 200 metara da im poveca range.

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Xepoj87
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Re: Alternativni pogoni, sistemi i komponente

Post od Xepoj87 » 25 Avg 2017, 19:13

Solarni siber na A8 je mogao citava 2 malecka ventalitorcica da okrece :D
>>>Mi to radimo najbolje!<<<
Prvi znak gluposti je potpuno odsustvo stida.

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HKS
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Re: Alternativni pogoni, sistemi i komponente

Post od HKS » 25 Avg 2017, 21:24

Imao je i Superb solarni siber
:D Na Audi klub Srbija sam procitao da je to, kao sto i ti kazes, beskorisno.

Послато са m2 уз помоћ Тапатока


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Mr.Rotor
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Re: Alternativni pogoni, sistemi i komponente

Post od Mr.Rotor » 25 Avg 2017, 23:48

Apsolutno beskorisno.
Слободу си вечно, закржљала раcо,
Чек’о да донесу туђи бајонети,
По горама својим туђа стада пас’о,
Јер достојно не знаш за Слободу мрети.

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HKS
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Re: Alternativni pogoni, sistemi i komponente

Post od HKS » 05 Sep 2017, 17:06

Hidrogen Merc


auto.blog.rs/blog/auto/top-secret/2017/ ... frankfurtu

Послато са m2 уз помоћ Тапатока


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HKS
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Re: Alternativni pogoni, sistemi i komponente

Post od HKS » 08 Okt 2017, 19:46

http://autorepublika.com/2017/10/06/vla ... vek-bolji/

Послато са m2 уз помоћ Тапатока


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Geza
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Re: Alternativni pogoni, sistemi i komponente

Post od Geza » 12 Okt 2017, 22:03

LG to open Europe's biggest car battery factory
http://europe.autonews.com/article/2017 ... ry-factory

WARSAW -- South Korea's LG Chem will open Europe's largest lithium-ion battery factory in Poland next year as the region's auto industry gears up to mass produce electric cars.

Tumbling battery prices and growing pressure to cut exhaust emissions have led carmakers to embrace electric vehicles. Manufacturers from VW Group to Volvo Cars, Daimler and BMW plan to roll out a raft of new electric models in coming years.

But Europe lacks big-scale battery cell production facilities so those components are mostly imported from China and South Korea.

Calls are now growing for the region to develop its own battery industry to preserve jobs and profits, though Asian producers have a huge head start in development and scale.

LG Chem plans to spend 5.9 billion zlotys ($1.63 billion) on the factory near the southwestern city of Wroclaw, according to Polish state industry agency ARP.

Wroclaw is 190 km (118 miles) from the border with Germany, home of VW Group which plans to invest more than 20 billion euros ($24 billion) in zero-emission vehicles by 2030 and make 3 million electric vehicles (EVs) a year by 2025.

LG Chem expects to produce up to 100,000 EV batteries in Poland annually from next year, it said on Thursday in a statement. The factory will employ 2,500 people. LG Chem, a subsidiary of Korea's LG Corp, did not name the likely customers but said they would include top car companies.

"The company has chosen Poland as the most competitive location for production to satisfy the needs of European and global car producers," said Chang-Beom Kang, vice president at LG Chem.

It was not immediately clear if the factory would produce all the basic battery cells from scratch or import some components, but the statement said the site would include a research and development center employing "about 400 engineers from various specializations: automation, electronics, chemistry and IT."

Asked about the source of lithium and other raw materials, a representative of LG Chem's local arm said they would first be imported from the parent company in Korea and then hopefully from Polish suppliers.

Demand surge

The factory's planned capacity is just a fraction of expected future demand.

Based on the typical capacity of a mid-market compact car like Nissan Leaf, 100,000 car batteries are equivalent to 4 GWh per year. This means the factory's capacity could be slightly more than 10 percent of the production capacity that Tesla's U.S. based "Gigafactory" is to reach in 2018.

Battery costs have been prohibitive but are falling rapidly. Average battery costs have come down from over $1,000 per kilowatt hour in 2010, to around $227 in 2016, according to analysts at Barclays.

In 2016, only 0.2 percent of new passenger cars sold in Europe were fully electric.

But Britain and France say they will ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2040 in an attempt to reduce air pollution, ending use of the fossil fuel-guzzling internal combustion engine.

LG's Polish plant may not remain Europe's largest car battery plant for long.

In September, Swiss engineering group ABB said it had joined a project to build Europe's largest lithium-ion battery factory in Sweden targeting annual cell production equivalent to 32 gigawatt-hours by 2023, over 90 percent of Tesla's Gigafactory target.

That project, named Northvolt, is led by a former manager at Tesla, which also plans to build a Gigafactory in Europe, though it has not said where.
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Re: Alternativni pogoni, sistemi i komponente

Post od Geza » 13 Okt 2017, 19:38

Iz Brazila za 2 godine stiže Volkswagenov E-Delivery električni kamion.

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Najgore je svađati se sa budalom. Prvo te spusti na svoj nivo, a onda te dotuče iskustvom...
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Geza
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Re: Alternativni pogoni, sistemi i komponente

Post od Geza » 03 Nov 2017, 12:20

BMW, VW, Daimler ready pan-European charging network
http://europe.autonews.com/article/2017 ... ng-network

FRANKFURT -- BMW, Daimler, Volkswagen and Ford are among a group of automakers who have formed a joint venture to create out a pan-European network of 400 fast charging stations for electric vehicles by the year 2020.

The venture, called Ionity, is backed by the automakers and include Volkswagen Group's Audi and Porsche brands, the companies said in a statement on Friday.

Ionity, to be headquartered in Munich, will open its first 20 charging stations to the public this year in Germany, Norway and Austria. These will be 120 km (75 miles) apart, and run in partnership with the companies Tank & Rast, Circle K and OMV.

The network will be expanded to 100 stations in 2018, each one enabling several drivers of different car brands to charge their vehicles at the same time.

Each charging point will have a capacity of 350 kW, and will use an existing European standard, the Combined Charging System, to reduce charging times compared to existing systems. The system is not tied to brands, which should make EVs more appealing to drivers, Ionity said.

"The first pan-European HPC network plays an essential role in establishing a market for electric vehicles," Ionity's CEO Michael Hajesch said. He added that the fast-charging stations would also offer digital-payment capability.

Anxiety over whether battery-powered cars have the range to reach their destination is inhibiting some drivers from switching from traditional gasoline- or diesel-powered models.

But with U.S. all-electric challenger Tesla stealing a lead, established brands are teaming up to ensure that EVs can get quickly back on the road after hooking up to a High-Power Charging (HPC) station.
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Re: Alternativni pogoni, sistemi i komponente

Post od Geza » 07 Nov 2017, 21:38

Six Problems With Electric Cars That Nobody Talks About
https://www.autoevolution.com/news/six- ... 12221.html

While the electric vehicle is over a century old in concept, the modern electric car is far from it, because the technology is in development as we speak. Sure, there are a few models on the market that you can buy today, and some have been around for more than a few years.

Unlike internal combustion engines, which have surpassed electrics back in the day because of deficient battery technology at the time (slightly ironic, you must admit) there is a long way to go concerning electric vehicle powertrain development.

Electric engines are smaller, more compact, and more efficient than existing and even theoretical internal combustion units, while the batteries are getting better and better.

The problem today is that people do not like waiting, and it takes awhile to charge an electric car, not to mention planning trips. People want electric cars today, and they want them to be at least as great as conventional vehicles.

To be fair, these requirements are entirely reasonable from someone that is asked to pay installments for a few years for an asset that might have a sharp depreciation curve.

In other words, unless automakers will commit to updating the existing electric vehicles they have sold, within reasonable limits — evidently, the EVs found on the market today will be obsolete in less than ten years.

The level of obsolescence will far exceed that of a conventional vehicle, because batteries should become exquisite in 2026, while charging times should also be drastically reduced.

The resale value of such an automobile could become a significant burden for those that own them, if anyone will want to buy a 10-year-old electric vehicle. Imagine buying a “Palm Treo” phone from 2006 (Go ahead, Google that), which was considered a “smartphone” at the time.

It will probably be awful, battery life will be disastrous if the original unit is used, and features and functionality will be unimproved since 2006, thus obsolete like an 8-track system in the year 2000. Alternatively, today, for that matter.

Considering the rapid advancement of electric car technology, we decided to look away from the bright side of things and think about the worst parts of this technology.

We agree that a vehicle that brings no tailpipe emissions is good for the environment, but this article focuses on the other aspects of this technology — the hidden and unadvertised bits.


Manufacturing on multiple continents — complicated shipping requirements


Most conventional cars tend to be built with parts sourced close to the factories that make them. Many automakers opened facilities in other continents to cater to the needs of different markets at lower costs.

It was and still is cheaper to build cars on one continent and sell them exclusively in the respective markets than to use a single facility. The situation changes only for exclusive brands, which do not care that much about final costs, but also for automakers that have access to significant shipping deals.

When the first hybrid cars came to market, they were criticized for using Ni-Mh batteries. Those used metals sourced from mines found in isolated places in the world, and the rare substances had to be shipped across the world to be turned into batteries, and then they would be sent again to the factory that made hybrid cars.

Things have not changed dramatically for electric vehicles, except for the fact that automakers have begun making batteries in-house. However, that does not mean that the shipping chain does not lead back to a country that is far away from the factory, and that expensive metals have to be transported great distances to build batteries for electric cars.


Lithium and other rare metals — where do they come from and at what cost?

As we wrote above, electric vehicles need precious metals for their batteries. At first, hybrids used Ni-Mh batteries, but competitive electric vehicles rely on the Li-Ion technology. The expensive part is called Lithium, and it is getting more expensive these days. However, where does it come from?

According to a 2015 US Geological Survey, Australia is the world’s biggest supplier of lithium. It is followed by Chile, Argentina, China, and Zimbabwe in the top five.

Just like oil, lithium is a finite resource, and it is becoming more expensive because of the demands made by automakers. Until something better comes along, lithium could become extremely costly. At the same time, electric cars will also have a bigger price because of the cost of lithium.

The problem with electric vehicles is that lithium is not the only rare material used in their construction. Other “rare earth minerals” like “dysprosium,” “lanthanum,” “neodymium,” and “praseodymium” are used.

For exemplification purposes, the electric motor needs neodymium and praseodymium, and "a touch of" dysprosium. The old batteries in Ni-Mh hybrid cars required lanthanum, but the new ones still need some of these precious rare earth minerals. They are mined in conditions that are not optimal, and their demand hurts the environment.


Battery recycling — is everybody ready for it?

The first Prius is almost 20 years old. Its batteries have surely not been in service for that long, and they must have been replaced. If the advent of electric cars will follow the predictions announced by automakers, we will have a lot of Lithium Ion batteries to recycle in 2045.

The year 2045 is not a typo, because it comes 20 years after the predicted boom of electric vehicles, which is expected to happen by 2025.

While Lithium-Ion batteries can be recycled, and so can Ni-Mh ones, we do not have a massive market for those that recycle Lithium-based batteries. A few companies exist in the field, but there is nobody that stepped out and said: “hey, we will take care of those batteries, we are good for it.”

While we find the fact that Lithium recycling facilities do not exist at the scale required when all of those electric cars will be parted out and meet the crusher, we do understand why. The world does not have a big market for electric cars yet, and the conventional ones do not get recycled properly in the first place. So do not throw that stone just yet.

Toyota has a collection program for its old batteries, which involves giving a new life for the units that used to sit in Prius models. The cycle can still be improved to make these vehicles truly eco-friendly.


Goodbye easy fixes and jump-starts

Electric vehicles will not bring any easy fixes for their owners. Except for a flat tire or a burnt light bulb, your DIY days are over with electric cars. People do not work on modern cars because they have become too complicated nevertheless, but offering someone a jump-start will not happen with electric vehicles.

While this means that those vehicles will have to be more reliable than conventional ones, one does wonder what will happen to an unlucky owner of an electric vehicle that is out of a warranty and has a significant powertrain malfunction. With a conventional car, things can be fixed in most workshops at reasonable rates, depending on how bad the damage was.

No self-governing service unit knows how to fix electric motors of automotive grade, and most do not have the tools needed to work on those cars. So, instead of getting your car fixed at a workshop, they will politely send you off to the dealer. If the said dealer were to overcharge you, tough luck.


No adventures into remote areas for you

Remember the Land Rover Camel Trophy? The pictures and video footage of those adventures have brought a profound respect for that brand from many people, myself included. Those Land Rovers could handle everything that was thrown at them, and big jerry cans solved the problem of fuel.

While some people have managed to drive electric vehicles from one point to another, embarking on thrilling adventures in some cases, none of the trips has targeted remote areas.

We do not expect that to happen too soon, if ever, because it will take many years for electric cars to attain a “comfortable” range on a single charge. It would have to give someone the level of trust in the machine’s ability to cross difficult terrain, across vast distances, without becoming a very expensive forest decoration. Pun intended.

In other words, electric cars will not bring the complete death of the conventional vehicle. Not in remote areas, and possibly not in places where the climate is unfriendly. The same applies to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles, which also require a complex fueling system and procedure.


Renewable electricity and hydrogen, please?

Roses are wonderful flowers, but they have thorns. They can be removed, but you must be careful. The same goes for electric cars and even hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. No tailpipe emissions from these two categories of vehicles, but electric power usually comes from non-renewable sources.

Governments in most countries are focusing on obtaining “green energy,” but progress is rather slow. If you live in a house instead of an apartment building, you can get solar panels to power it, and an electric vehicle can be charged from them. However, solar panels are not cheap, and those needed to power a car are not on the lower side of the price scale.

At this point, you probably think that hydrogen is the best way forward, right? Well, not exactly, because large scale manufacturing of hydrogen extracts the gas from methane, and it generates carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide.

A tad ironic, right? Fortunately, both of these problems have theoretic fixes, but they need a significant volume of potential customers to be implemented, along with government subsidies and support.
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Geza
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Re: Alternativni pogoni, sistemi i komponente

Post od Geza » 20 Nov 2017, 16:21

Mercedes-Benz eVito
41.4 kWh battery pack that takes approximately six hours to charge, providing a range of around 150km (93miles). However, in low temperatures, and with a full load of more than 1,000kg (2,205lbs), the Mercedes-Benz eVito can travel for some 100km.

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